Luke Persichetti was born and raised near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He graduated from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, in 2018, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in Economics.  Luke has relocated to Manhattan to pursue a career in the financial industry. While at Yale, he had the opportunity to work in fixed income trading.  Luke Persichetti hopes to become a knowledgeable and respected investor.  His long-term goal is to open his own business within the industry.

Luke’s hobbies include weight-lifting to keep physically fit, and while he was in school, he participated in track and field as a shot-putter. He also volunteered his time as a coach. He enjoys movies and watching T.V., but his biggest pleasure comes from reading various genres. You would either find Luke Persichetti studying the markets and the financial industry or engrossed in a classic novel of his choice.  Overall, Luke immerses himself in the literary arts, films, and T.V. dramas. He considers the parallels in these artistic presentations and enjoys the comparison of and interactions between these different forms of discourse.

What are your hobbies?

I was a shot-putter in track and field at Yale University.  As a thrower, I would model much of my strength training after that of Olympic weightlifters. I enjoy training this way today to keep strong and physically fit. Currently, my favorite pastime is reading. I am most interested in historical reading and books about the American economy, the financial system, political strategy, and public policy. I also enjoy watching movies and television shows that revolve around significant moments in American history.

How did you get started reading such a wide range of genres?

I took an economics course in high school that was very challenging. I also found it to be extremely interesting. It compelled me to explore the possibility of majoring in economics at Yale. It was not until after college, however, that I became deeply interested in connecting the principals and the underlying logic of economics to other subjects. I began reading about behavioral economics, geopolitics from a macro perspectives, and many other academically intersectional topics. My reading interests largely stemmed from studying economics, which also led me to the financial industry. Working on wall street further stoked my interest in reading the works of the most influential figures in finance and investing.

Can you share what you love most about reading?

Again, its use in my education and professional background plays a big part. I also simply like having a variety of subjects on which I am knowledgeable. I find that if nothing else, it makes you more conversational.  It becomes much easier to express your thoughts and expand on any type of discussion.  I also think reading virtually anything can help improve analytical and reasoning skills.  Finally, reading a diversity of viewpoints and opinions allows for a thorough approach to forming one’s own ideas.

Are there any reading groups or events that you attend regularly?

I have found great success having open discussions with colleagues on a regular basis. I haven’t found any other discussion groups thus far, but I am open to expanding my horizon in this regard.

Can you share some of the books that you’ve purchased?

I just finished reading A Man for all Markets by Edward O. Thorp. Thorp began as a math professor at MIT. He later came up with systems to beat a number of casino games. He developed card-counting systems to beat blackjack and baccarat as well as a wearable computer to beat roulette.  After that, he took his talents to wall street and opened up a hedge fund centered around the then-novel idea of statistical arbitrage. I greatly enjoyed the book. I have just begun reading a Stephen King novel called Misery. Every sixth book I read is fictional and I really enjoyed the last novel I read of his. I think there is a reason that so many of his works are made into films.

What are your favorite all-time books?

A nonfiction book that I like a lot is Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin. Another is called The Most Important Thing by Howard Marks. As far as fiction goes, my favorite novel is probably One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey. At risk of sounding cliché, I also love J.D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye.

Where do you buy most of your books?

I buy most of my books on Amazon.

Why do you rely on Amazon for all of your books?

I rely on Amazon because I have a Prime account and they make it incredibly easy to order books. It allows me to speed up the process screening new books to read and to save options for later.

If someone wanted to start reading to develop it into a hobby what kind of reading would you suggest?

I would say to find the thing that most interests you. Think of your hobbies, as well as one person, event, or idea that you have a cursory knowledge of from school but would like to know more about. You can also focus on topics that you think will most benefit you in your chosen career. One of the best ways to ease into reading daily is to start with a wide array of newspapers and editorials.  Beginning with shorter, fresher pieces can help you train yourself to read consistently.

How has reading changed your life?

It definitely has. It has made me curious and knowledgeable about far more topics than I otherwise would be.  A mental library can be extremely beneficial in conversations, debates, and all kinds of other human interactions. Reading is also a great way to relax and lower anxiety. There are few things better than sitting on the beach with great book and I’ve found it very helpful during the most stressful times of my life.

How do your other hobbies influence your reading?

I am very interested in television and film. Many of the shows and movies I watch tend to be analogous to what I read. For example, love the first season HBO’s True Detective partly because of the many Lovecraftian influences it draws upon. If you are well-read, you can find a lot more to tap into and think about when watching and interacting with other forms of art and discourse.

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